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Celebrating the Women at Crimson Education

09 APR 2021

During the month of March, we celebrated the incredible women from around the world making an impact on their communities through education, invention, and innovation.

Today and every day, we celebrate the women at Crimson Education, who have dedicated themselves to mentoring, educating, motivating, and inspiring younger generations to find their voice, and more importantly, to use it.

Hear from some of the women at Crimson and read their advice, words of wisdom, and female role models that they have learned about or from thus far in their careers.Women At Crimson


Anjali Bhatia (U.S.)

What is one piece of advice you would give your 16-year-old self?

  • Stay mindful! A million things will be going on all the time. Make sure you aren’t so involved with everything that you miss out on learning and being present for all your opportunities.

Who is a woman that you admire at Crimson and why?

  • Kim Scott, our SVP of Global Marketing. She has an incredible form of leadership where she brings empathy and kindness into every single situation. She’s always willing to jump into every situation. She balances this with being an incredible mother as well.

What is one thing you hope for future generations of women?

  • I hope you feel empowered to wear your accomplishments with pride!

Na’ama Landau (U.S. & New Zealand)

What is one piece of advice you would give your 16-year-old self?

  • Understand that you have the potential to make a big impact, regardless of what those around you are doing. Step outside the box, there is a whole world of opportunity here!

How do you define a strong woman?

  • A woman who holds her own regardless of the situation, who is not afraid to be vulnerable and kind while succeeding in her field.

Who is your favorite female author?

  • Right now, Christina Lauren (two women!) and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie!

Phoebe Tran (Vietnam)

How do you define a strong woman?

  • Someone who creates and encourages positivity, consistently.

What is one thing you hope for future generations of women?

  • That the proportion of top and middle-tier women leaders in the world matches the ratio of XX and XY chromosomes in nature.

What is one gender stereotype you’ve defied?

  • That women in my country need to be “either-or” - “aggressive or gentle”, “career-focused or family-oriented”, “single or married”, “educated or overly-educated” - The spectrum in which I’ve lived my life is proof that adhering to no binary brings immense joy, and illuminates a reality of how modern women may live if her mind is open and her family Facebook thread is free.

Chloe Godsell (U.K)

What is one piece of advice you would give your 16-year-old self?

  • Stand tall, speak up, and keep looking forward.

How do you define a strong woman?

  • One who knows her innate worth, fights for her rights, and inspires the next generation to do the same.

What is one gender stereotype you’ve defied?

  • I am passionate about my child and my career and will always give 100% to both. I balance full-time hours with my duties as a mum and feel enriched by my choices. I defy anyone who expects women to compromise on their ambitions when they become parents.

Kim Scott (Australia)

What is one piece of advice you would give your 16-year-old self?

  • To not be afraid. I think I was afraid of everything at 16: failing, not finding my feet, not becoming who I thought I could become. In the end, I found most women can handle anything thrown at them and still come out with a balance of kindness and courage.

What is one gender stereotype you’ve defied?

  • Referring to a very old stereotype I am a terrible cook, but I can paint a house and tackle pretty much any handyperson job thrown at me.

Who is your favorite female author?

  • I have lots! Sylvia Plath, Jane Austen, Harper Lee, Kate Chopin, Katherine Mansfield to name a few!

Carol Lyrio (Brazil)

What is one piece of advice you would give your 16-year-old self?

  • Don’t worry about always getting it right - we learn a lot when we get it wrong

How do you define a strong woman?

  • Someone who does not need to make others feel weak or put them down to feel strong, especially other women

What is one thing you hope for future generations of women?

  • That they will become less concerned with pleasing those around them

Cassidy Goldblatt (U.S.)

What is one piece of advice you would give your 16-year-old self?

  • You can serve the world around you wherever and whenever you are; you don't have to finish your education to be equipped to do something "useful." You also don't need to rush to the completion of a goal, as no one knows what tomorrow will actually hold and every present moment has its own purpose. Finally, there's a time for everything: a time for overextending and a time for stepping back, a time for being pressed, and a time for taking space to create. Embrace the stage you're in and learn what you can from it!

How do you define a strong woman?

  • A woman who is patient and gracious, who can love and live generously in a broken world, and who can bear cruelty while forgiving those who have done (or wished) her ill.

Who is your favorite female author?

  • Charlotte Bronte!

Quinn Koh (Singapore)

What is one piece of advice you would give your 16-year-old self?

  • I would advise myself to spend more time reflecting and making more daring plans for the future!

What is one gender stereotype you’ve defied?

  • Taking up muay thai (Thai kickboxing) and kicking ass

Who is your favorite woman in STEM?

  • Sylvia Earle. I’m deeply inspired by her marine biology and conservation work done as a female researcher in “a man’s world” decades ago and continues to break barriers to this day.

Aigul Begdullayeva (Kazakhstan)

How do you define a strong woman?

  • These two women represent it the best - Leila Alice Denmark and Dorsa Derakhshani.

What woman inspires you the most?

  • The one who found the balance between her personal/career interests and the family ones.
Amanda J

Written by

Amanda J.

Amanda graduated from the University of Connecticut where she majored in Communication & Marketing. While in college, she wrote for & managed social media for Culture Trip, while also creating marketing content for dessert company, Petit Pot. Her focus of communication extends cross-culturally through her years working with Rustic Pathways. In her free time, she enjoys hiking, going to concerts, and spending time at the beach. She is now the Marketing Executive for Crimson in the United States.